Barriers and Facilitators to Chlorine Tablet Distribution and Use in Emergencies: A Qualitative Assessment

Publication year
2019
Emergency type
Country

Chlorine tablets are commonly distributed for household water treatment in emergencies. However, confirmed use after distribution ranges widely (from 7–87%), which raises concerns about chlorine tablet effectiveness, as measured by acceptance and appropriate use. To investigate chlorine tablet effectiveness, we conducted nine key informant interviews (KIIs) on tablet distribution in emergencies in general, five KIIs on chlorine taste and odor acceptance and rejection specifically, and a literature review on chlorine taste and odor concerns.

Infrastructure for All

Publication year
2007
Emergency type
Country

Infrastructure for All: Meeting the needs of both men and women in development projects — A practical guide for engineers, technicians and project managers.

How to support survivors of gender-based violence when a GBV actor is not available in your area: A step-by-step Pocket Guide for humanitarian practitioners

Publication year
2018
Emergency type
Country

In September 2015 the IASC Guidelines for Integrating Gender-based
Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings (GBV Guidelines) were launched. Over the course of 2016 and 2017, the GBV Guidelines Implementation Support Team trained over 2,500 humanitarian practitioners in 11 sectors and 18 countries on how to reduce gender-based violence-related risks in their programming.

Gender Responsive Water Sanitation and Hygiene: Key elements for effective WASH programming

Publication year
2017
Emergency type
Country

Effective gender-responsive programming in the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sector can contribute to progress towards gender equality and important WASH results. This document outlines essential elements that WASH practitioners should take into account at all points in the programme cycle in order to enhance a gender-responsive approach to their work.

Safeguarding Children in WASH

Publication year
2019
Country

The provision of safe water and adequate sanitation facilities to communities is a key part of Save the Children’s work in emergencies. However, improperly built and/or poorly maintained WASH facilities (such as latrines) have contributed to child fatalities and serious injuries in the past (commonly from the collapse of the latrine slab or the septic tank ceiling), as have death and injuries caused by water trucks, especially in crowded refugee camps.

Lactic Acid Fermentation, Urea and Lime Addition: Promising Faecal Sludge Sanitizing Methods for Emergency Sanitation

Publication year
2015
Country

In this research, three faecal sludge sanitizing methods—lactic acid fermentation, urea treatment and lime treatment—were studied for application in emergency situations. These methods were investigated by undertaking small scale field trials with pit latrine sludge in Blantyre, Malawi. Hydrated lime was able to reduce the E.

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Innovation Catalogue: A Collection of Innovations for the Humanitarian Sector

Publication year
2019
Emergency type
Country

Over the last few years, we have heavily invested in funding and supporting innovation and research in the WASH sector, highlighting gaps in evidence, exploring the problems, identifying opportunities where innovation can play a vital role, and funding the right people to find potential solutions.

What is the scope for addressing menstrual hygiene management in complex humanitarian emergencies A global review

Publication year
2016
Country

Global attention on improving the integration of menstrual hygiene management (MHM) into humanitarian response is growing. However, there continues to be a lack of consensus on how best to approach MHM inclusion within response activities. This global review assessed the landscape of MHM practice, policy, and research within the field of humanitarian response.

Emergency sanitation: developing criteria for pit latrine lining

Publication year
2016
Emergency type
Country

Pit latrine linings for emergency sanitation facilities require different performance criteria from those for pits used in longer-term development work. Various international initiatives are currently under way to develop new methods of supporting the pits used for latrines in emergencies, but before a solution can be found, the problem needs to be defined. Current field guidance lacks the level of detail required by humanitarian workers to construct durable pits in a timely manner.