Barriers and Facilitators to Chlorine Tablet Distribution and Use in Emergencies: A Qualitative Assessment

Publication year
2019
Emergency type
Country

Chlorine tablets are commonly distributed for household water treatment in emergencies. However, confirmed use after distribution ranges widely (from 7–87%), which raises concerns about chlorine tablet effectiveness, as measured by acceptance and appropriate use. To investigate chlorine tablet effectiveness, we conducted nine key informant interviews (KIIs) on tablet distribution in emergencies in general, five KIIs on chlorine taste and odor acceptance and rejection specifically, and a literature review on chlorine taste and odor concerns.

Cholera prevention and control in refugee settings: Successes and continued challenges

Publication year
2019
Country

Cholera continues to be a significant problem in humanitarian settings, with recent outbreaks in displaced populations in South Sudan, Yemen, Cameroon, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, Haiti, and Iraq. The success of cholera prevention and control in refugee camps over the past 2 decades highlights the possibility of managing this deadly disease, even in complicated humanitarian crises.

Diarrhoeal disease outbreaks associated with sanitation provision failures in refugee camps worldwide: a literature review

Publication year
2019
Country

The objective of this review is to identify sanitation failures that have contributed to the occurrence of diarrhoeal disease outbreaks among displaced populations living in camps. Three electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Global Health) and reference lists were searched for peer-reviewed literature using a systematic approach. Articles published since 1960 describing both diarrhoeal disease outbreaks and sanitation characteristics in camps hosting displaced populations were included.

A Shining Light: How lighting in or around sanitation facilities affects the risk of gender-based violence in camps

Publication year
2018

Camps are places of refuge for people fleeing conflict and disaster, but they can be dangerous, especially for women and girls. In their first months, many camps rely on communal sanitation facilities – a quick and cost-effective way of meeting immediate needs and minimizing public health risks until a better solution can be developed. Sharing latrines and bathing areas with large numbers of strangers, however, can be frightening.

Lighting, WASH and Gender-Based Violence in Camp Settings: Literature Review

Publication year
2018

Poor lighting at water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities may reduce the usage of latrines and other services such as bathing areas and water collection points; especially by women and children. Generally, poor lighting may contribute to fear of crime and specifically Gender-Based Violence (GBV), which may, in turn, further reduce the use of the WASH facilities. For example, in Haiti, teenage girls surveyed by the United Nations (UN) Stabilisation Mission stated that they were afraid to use latrines at night because of the lack of lighting (Emery et al., 2011).

Infrastructure for All

Publication year
2007
Emergency type
Country

Infrastructure for All: Meeting the needs of both men and women in development projects — A practical guide for engineers, technicians and project managers.

How to support survivors of gender-based violence when a GBV actor is not available in your area: A step-by-step Pocket Guide for humanitarian practitioners

Publication year
2018
Emergency type
Country

In September 2015 the IASC Guidelines for Integrating Gender-based
Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings (GBV Guidelines) were launched. Over the course of 2016 and 2017, the GBV Guidelines Implementation Support Team trained over 2,500 humanitarian practitioners in 11 sectors and 18 countries on how to reduce gender-based violence-related risks in their programming.

Gender Responsive Water Sanitation and Hygiene: Key elements for effective WASH programming

Publication year
2017
Emergency type
Country

Effective gender-responsive programming in the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sector can contribute to progress towards gender equality and important WASH results. This document outlines essential elements that WASH practitioners should take into account at all points in the programme cycle in order to enhance a gender-responsive approach to their work.

Safeguarding Children in WASH

Publication year
2019
Country

The provision of safe water and adequate sanitation facilities to communities is a key part of Save the Children’s work in emergencies. However, improperly built and/or poorly maintained WASH facilities (such as latrines) have contributed to child fatalities and serious injuries in the past (commonly from the collapse of the latrine slab or the septic tank ceiling), as have death and injuries caused by water trucks, especially in crowded refugee camps.