Understanding the performance of emergency feeding programmes: Save the Children’s CMAM Report

Publication year
2016
Emergency type

This case study explores IFRC’s innovation process in developing and testing a comprehensive relief item to meet more effectively and appropriately the menstrual hygiene needs of women and girls in emergencies. To address the multifaceted nature of menstrual hygiene management (MHM), grantees used a kitbased approach, including appropriate sanitary and hygiene items along with training for staff and information for beneficiaries.

Characterization of Disinfection By-Products Levels at an Emergency Surface Water Treatment Plant in a Refugee Settlement in Northern Uganda

Publication year
2019
Emergency type
Country

The reliance on chlorination in humanitarian operations has raised concerns among practitioners about possible health risks associated with disinfection by-products; however, to date, there has not been an evaluation of disinfection by-product (DBP) levels in an emergency water supply intervention. This study aimed to investigate DBP levels at a surface-water treatment plant serving a refugee settlement in northern Uganda using the colorimetric Hach THM Plus Method.

Lighting the Way: Lighting, sanitation and the risk of gender-based violence Omugo extension camp, Uganda

Publication year
2018
Emergency type
Country

Humanitarian agencies strive to provide sanitation facilities which are safe, accessible and afford users privacy and dignity. Yet in reality, women in particular have many concerns which can prevent them from using the facilities, especially after dark. This report documents field research on whether sanitation lighting reduces risks of gender-based violence in Omugo Extension Camp in northern Uganda.

A Shining Light: How lighting in or around sanitation facilities affects the risk of gender-based violence in camps

Publication year
2018

Camps are places of refuge for people fleeing conflict and disaster, but they can be dangerous, especially for women and girls. In their first months, many camps rely on communal sanitation facilities – a quick and cost-effective way of meeting immediate needs and minimizing public health risks until a better solution can be developed. Sharing latrines and bathing areas with large numbers of strangers, however, can be frightening.

Lighting, WASH and Gender-Based Violence in Camp Settings: Literature Review

Publication year
2018

Poor lighting at water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities may reduce the usage of latrines and other services such as bathing areas and water collection points; especially by women and children. Generally, poor lighting may contribute to fear of crime and specifically Gender-Based Violence (GBV), which may, in turn, further reduce the use of the WASH facilities. For example, in Haiti, teenage girls surveyed by the United Nations (UN) Stabilisation Mission stated that they were afraid to use latrines at night because of the lack of lighting (Emery et al., 2011).

Menstration management: a neglected aspect of hygiene interventions

Publication year
2014
Country

Effective menstrual management is essential for the mental and physical well-being of women. However, many women in low-income countries lack access to the materials and facilities required. They are thus restricted in their activities whilst menstruating thus compromising their education, income and domestic responsibilities. The paper aims to discuss these issues. This study describes the menstrual management challenges faced by women in an emergency situation in Uganda.

Impact of jerry can disinfection in a camp environment - experiences in an IDP camp in Northern Uganda

Publication year
2008
Country

In July 2007, a study by the Centre for Environmental Health Engineering, at the University of Surrey, assessed a modified method of jerry can cleaning in an internally displaced persons (IDP) camp in Kitgum, N. Uganda. The poor condition of drinking water vessels used in the camp was confirmed as a potential source for microbiological contamination both visually and by microbiological testing. Jerry cans were disinfected using high strength sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) generated using an experimental AquaChlor Solar unit.

The WASH approach: fighting waterborne diseases in emergency situations

Publication year
2015
Country

Fecal-oral diseases can proliferate rapidly, sometimes to epidemic proportions, when people in crowded conditions lack clean water for hygiene and sanitation. Among the agents involved are at least 20 viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens that cause diseases such as cholera, bacillary dysentery, and the relatively recently discovered hepatitis E.

Shedding Light on Humanitarian Sanitation

Publication year
2018
Country

Lighting should be provided for WASH facilities in Humanitarian contexts according to several standards. Evidence for this and the practical budget, operational and management responsibilities are less clear. A three-country research project looking at the impact of lighting on WASH use and Gender-Based Violence (GBV) required a multi-disciplinary approach, combining OXFAM's practical implementing expertise with WEDC's research-oriented approach. The research showed how much more is needed for safe sanitation than just building latrines.