WASH Coordination in Humanitarian Response: Evidence Summary

Publication year
2019
Emergency type
Country

Providing water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) to emergency-affected populations is necessary for dignity and
disease control. Coordination, via the ‘cluster approach’, is key to WASH program success. We summarized the
outcomes and impacts of WASH cluster coordination using a mixed-methods approach, including literature review,
summary of UNICEF documents, and key informant interviews with experienced cluster staff. Across these three
data sets, consistent themes were identified, including: the cluster approach as a cost-effective ‘best-fit’ model that

Water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions in outbreak response: a synthesis of evidence

Publication year
2018
Country

Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions are key to reducing the burden of disease associated with outbreaks, and are commonly implemented in emergency response. However, there is a lack of summarized evidence on the efficacy and effectiveness of these interventions. We conducted a systematic review of published and grey literature by developing theory of change models, developing inclusion criteria, conducting the search, selecting evaluations for inclusion, assessing the quality of the evidence, and analysing the included evaluations.

Chlorination of drinking water in emergencies: a review of knowledge to develop recommendations for implementation and research needed

Publication year
2017
Emergency type
Country

Clean water provision is a critical component of emergency response, and chlorination is widely used in emergencies to treat water. To provide responders with practical, evidencebased recommendations for implementing chlorination programmes and recommend areas for future research, we conducted a literature review of chlorination in emergencies, supplemented with a literature review on chlorination in general.

Setting priorities for humanitarian water, sanitation and hygiene research: a meeting report

Publication year
2018
Emergency type
Country

Recent systematic reviews have highlighted a paucity of rigorous evidence to guide water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions in humanitarian crises. In June 2017, the Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises (R2HC) programme of Elrha, convened a meeting of representatives from international response agencies, research institutions and donor organisations active in the field of humanitarian WASH to identify research priorities, discuss challenges conducting research and to establish next steps.

Effectiveness of chlorine dispensers in emergencies: case study results from Haiti, Sierra Leone, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Senegal

Publication year
2015

Dispensers are a source-based water quality intervention with promising uptake results in development contexts. Dispenser programs include a tank of chlorine with a dosing valve that is installed next to a water source, a local Promoter who conducts community education and refills the Dispenser, and chlorine refills. In collaboration with response organizations, we assessed the effectiveness of Dispensers in four emergency situations.

WASH Interventions in Disease Outbreak Response: Evidence Synthesis.

Publication year
2017
Country

This evidence synthesis identifies, synthesizes and evaluates existing evidence of the impacts of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions in disease outbreaks in 51 humanitarian contexts in 19 low and middle-income countries. The research team developed theories of change for the WASH interventions under consideration, documenting the theoretical route from intervention activities to outputs, outcomes, and impacts. WASH interventions consistently reduce both the risk of disease and the risk of transmission in outbreak contexts.

Efficacy and effectiveness of water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions in emergencies in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review Open Primary tabs configuration options Primary tabs

Publication year
2018
Country

There are increasing numbers of people affected by natural disasters, disease outbreaks, and conflict. Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions are used in nearly all emergency responses to help reduce disease risk. However, there is a lack of summarized evidence on the efficacy and effectiveness of these interventions.

Household Water Treatment and Cholera Control

Publication year
2018
Country

Water,  sanitation,  and  hygiene  are  one  part  of  a  cholera  control  strategy.  Household  water  treatment  (HWT)  in  particular  has  been  shown  to  improve  the  microbiological  quality  of  stored  water  and  reduce  the  disease  burden.  We  conducted  a  systematic  review  of  published  and  gray  literature  to  determine  the  outcomes  and  impacts  of  HWT  in  preventing  cholera  specifically.  Fourteen  manuscripts  with  18  evaluations  of  HWT  interventions  in  cholera  were  identified.  Overall,  a  moderate  quality  of  evidence  suggests  that  HWT  int