Frontiers of CLTS: Innovations and Insights - CLTS in Post-Emergency and Fragile States Settings

Publication year
2016

As  an  alternative,  CLTS  can  appear  fundamentally  mismatched  with  post-emergency  and  fragile  states  contexts:  the  core  principle  that  sanitation  hardware  should  not  be  subsidised  can  conflict  with  urgent  need,  and  with  what  some  will  view  as  a  contravention  to  the  right  of  human  assistance.  Affected  populations  have  often  lost  all  their  wealth,  and  are  traumatised,  physically  weak,  insecure,  and  at  the  point  of  greatest  dependency  on  the  aid  community.  Furthermore,  the  least  able  memb

Sodium Hypochlorite Dosage for Household and Emergency Water Treatment

Publication year
2008
Emergency type

Point-of-use  (POU)  water  treatment  with  sodium  hypochlorite  (NaOCl)  has been  proven  to  reduce  diarrheal  disease  in  developing  countries.  However, program  implementation  is  complicated  by  unclear  free  chlorine  residual guidelines  for  POU  water  treatment  and  difficulties  in  determining  appropriate dosage  recommendations.  The  author  presents  evidence  supporting  proposed criteria  for  household  water  treatment  for  free  chlorine  residuals  of  <  2.0  mg/L1  h  after  NaOCl  addition  and  >  0.2  mg/L  aft

Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Related to Treatment and Prevention of Cholera, Haiti, 2010

Publication year
2011
Emergency type
Country

In response to the recent cholera outbreak, a public health response targeted high-risk communities, including resource-poor communities in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. A survey covering knowledge and practices indicated that hygiene messages were received and induced behavior change, specifically related to water treatment practices. Self-reported household water treatment increased from 30.3% to 73.9%.

Use of Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage Methods in Acute Emergency Response: Case Study Results from Nepal, Indonesia, Kenya, and Haiti

Publication year
2012
Emergency type

Household water treatment (HWTS) methods, such as boiling or chlorination, have long been recommended in emergencies. While there is increasing evidence of HWTS efficacy in the development context, effectiveness in the acute emergency context has not been rigorously assessed. We investigated HWTS effectiveness in response to four acute emergencies by surveying 1521 targeted households and testing stored water for free chlorine residual and fecal indicators.

Innovative designs and approaches in sanitation when responding to challenging and complex humanitarian contexts in urban areas

Publication year
2012
Emergency type

As recent emergencies have shown, there are still significant challenges in the timely provision of safe sanitation in natural disasters or conflict situations. In urban emergencies or areas where it is impossible to dig simple pit latrines because of high water tables, hard rock, or lack of permission, it takes agencies considerable time to construct elevated latrines or alternative designs such as urine diversion toilets.

Effective Use of Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage in Response to the 2010 Haiti Earthquake

Publication year
2013
Emergency type
Country

When water supplies are compromised during an emergency, responders often recommend household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) methods, such as boiling or chlorination. We evaluated the near- and longer-term impact of chlorine and filter products distributed shortly after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. HWTS products were deemed as effective to use if they actually improved unsafe household drinking water to internationally accepted microbiological water quality standards.

Excreta disposal in emergencies: Bag and Peepoo trials with internally displaced people in Port-au-Prince

Publication year
2011
Emergency type
Country

After a series of earthquakes devastated Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on 12 January 2010, safe excreta disposal became an urgent priority. To mainstream innovative approaches to sanitation within the realities of urban humanitarian response, Oxfam GB undertook a trial from April to May 2010, of standard bag and Peepoo excreta disposal systems in two IDP settlements. Trial results demonstrate that with proper collection and removal, both bags and Peepoos are viable excreta disposal options in emergencies.

Ann Kite Yo Pale (let them speak) Best Practice and Lessons Learned in Communication with Disaster Affected Communities: Haiti 2010

Publication year
2011
Emergency type
Country

After the earthquake in Haiti in 2010, thousands of agencies, organizations, and individual people tried to find ways to help the people affected. However, there was also an outbreak of cholera in the town of St. Marc and the immediate response and evaluation by communication actors made an impact that was life or death. This study identifies best practice models in communication with affected populations that were implemented by humanitarians working in Haiti after the earthquake.

Urban Disaster Response and Recovery: Gender-sensitive WASH programming in post- earthquake Haiti

Publication year
2014
Emergency type
Country

After the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti in 2010, Oxfam carried out various activities to improve WASH facilities for communities and additional activities that targeted the cholera outbreak. The projects Oxfam implemented took into consideration gender discrimination and cultural practices and emphasized the differing needs of men and women with respect to WASH. Oxfam employed a gender-sensitive approach that recognized the privacy and hygiene needs of men and women and ensured that WASH facilities were as secure as possible.

Menstrual hygiene management in emergencies: Taking stock of support from UNICEF and partners

Publication year
2012
Emergency type

Refugee populations often flee with very little belongings and lack appropriate hygiene infrastructure in an environment that is unfamiliar to them. For women and girls, this also means that it is more difficult for them to have menstrual hygiene management (MHM). MHM is important in emergencies because it reduces the risk of infection to girls and women, provides empowerment to engage in activities and survival during emergencies, and the provision of safe facilities reduces risk of sexual abuse.