“Littered with Logos!”: An Investigation into the Relationship between Water Provision, Humanitarian Branding, Donor Accountability, and Self-Reliance in Ugandan Refugee Settlements

Publication year
2021
Emergency type
Country

The branding of humanitarian assets and programme signage (often in English) is common practice in displacement contexts. Such visibility is a reminder of the special status of refugee spaces and a requirement imposed by donors. However, such branding, which forms part of the humanitarian organisations’ accountability to donors, raises profound issues in relation to the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF) and the agenda of refugee self-reliance.

Rapid groundwater potential mapping in humanitarian contexts: improving borehole implementation in basement environments

Publication year
2021
Emergency type
Country

Emergency responses in humanitarian contexts require rapid set-up of water supply. Boreholes are often drilled where the needs are highest and not where hydrogeological conditions are most favourable. The Rapid Groundwater Potential Mapping (RGWPM) methodology was therefore developed as a practical tool to support borehole siting when time is critical, allowing strategic planning of geophysical campaigns.

Barriers and motivators to participation in hand washing promotion programs at household level among refugees in Rhino Settlement, Arua District Uganda

Publication year
2020
Emergency type
Country

Introduction: The major aim of hand washing promotion programs is to persuade people to change their behaviour to reduce high-risk hygiene practices and use. Unfortunately, in a refugee setting, there is a dearth of information about participation in hand washing promotion programs. Objective: To assess barriers and motivators to participation in hand washing promotion programs at household level among refugees in Rhino Camp, Arua district, Uganda.

Evaluating two novel hand washing hardware and software solutions in Kyaka II Refugee Settlement, Uganda

Publication year
2020
Emergency type
Country

Handwashing with soap is widely recognized as a key strategy for reducing the transmission of disease, particularly in emergency contexts, where overcrowding and poor water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) conditions are common. Combining hygiene promotion with soap provision is accepted as one of the most cost-effective methods for disease prevention; however, this approach has not necessarily translated into a sustained increase in handwashing in emergency contexts.

Surface Water Treatment in Palorinya Refugee Settlement, Uganda

Publication year
2020
Emergency type
Country

MSF has intervened recently in several contexts where large-scale surface water treatment has been a significant feature of the WatSan response – Gambella (Ethiopia), Central African Republic (CAR) and Bentiu (South Sudan) are some examples. The impact of these interventions has been significant. Surface water treatment, if feasible, has better potential for covering the needs of a population in the immediate phase of a response than groundwater. It is simpler, cheaper and, usually, does not involve contracting services beyond basic construction activities. 

Understanding the performance of emergency feeding programmes: Save the Children’s CMAM Report

Publication year
2016
Emergency type

This case study explores IFRC’s innovation process in developing and testing a comprehensive relief item to meet more effectively and appropriately the menstrual hygiene needs of women and girls in emergencies. To address the multifaceted nature of menstrual hygiene management (MHM), grantees used a kitbased approach, including appropriate sanitary and hygiene items along with training for staff and information for beneficiaries.

Characterization of Disinfection By-Products Levels at an Emergency Surface Water Treatment Plant in a Refugee Settlement in Northern Uganda

Publication year
2019
Emergency type
Country

The reliance on chlorination in humanitarian operations has raised concerns among practitioners about possible health risks associated with disinfection by-products; however, to date, there has not been an evaluation of disinfection by-product (DBP) levels in an emergency water supply intervention. This study aimed to investigate DBP levels at a surface-water treatment plant serving a refugee settlement in northern Uganda using the colorimetric Hach THM Plus Method.

Lighting the Way: Lighting, sanitation and the risk of gender-based violence Omugo extension camp, Uganda

Publication year
2018
Emergency type
Country

Humanitarian agencies strive to provide sanitation facilities which are safe, accessible and afford users privacy and dignity. Yet in reality, women in particular have many concerns which can prevent them from using the facilities, especially after dark. This report documents field research on whether sanitation lighting reduces risks of gender-based violence in Omugo Extension Camp in northern Uganda.

A Shining Light: How lighting in or around sanitation facilities affects the risk of gender-based violence in camps

Publication year
2018

Camps are places of refuge for people fleeing conflict and disaster, but they can be dangerous, especially for women and girls. In their first months, many camps rely on communal sanitation facilities – a quick and cost-effective way of meeting immediate needs and minimizing public health risks until a better solution can be developed. Sharing latrines and bathing areas with large numbers of strangers, however, can be frightening.

Lighting, WASH and Gender-Based Violence in Camp Settings: Literature Review

Publication year
2018

Poor lighting at water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities may reduce the usage of latrines and other services such as bathing areas and water collection points; especially by women and children. Generally, poor lighting may contribute to fear of crime and specifically Gender-Based Violence (GBV), which may, in turn, further reduce the use of the WASH facilities. For example, in Haiti, teenage girls surveyed by the United Nations (UN) Stabilisation Mission stated that they were afraid to use latrines at night because of the lack of lighting (Emery et al., 2011).